Building Futures in the Gambia is a registered charity.

 Charity status confirmed by Charity Commission 26/11/2014. Registered Charity No. 1159520

Website design by P. Kendrick and M. Chidler

Building Futures in The Gambia

Registered Charity No. 1159520

Bright Star School is in Old Yundum Village. It is a nursery school. It has one hundred and twenty pupils aged between three and five years old. It has two normal sized classrooms and a very small room nearby which is also used as a classroom. Imagine that…a normal sized classroom containing between fifty and sixty pupils instead of the usual thirty that we’re used to in England. The children in these classrooms sit by the desks, at the desks and on the desks. There should be a third classroom but it’s only half completed.

There are stacks of breeze blocks all over the Bright Star School site: a sign that once upon a time, the intention was for the school to be a much bigger place. But then the funding ran out.


The Well

The Head Teacher at Bright Star Nursery School is Betty Gomez. She is young, passionate about her school and really keen to develop sustainable links. We asked her how we could help the school and its children. She asked for the third classroom to be completed.

In January 2013, following another year of fund raising involving Newman University and its students, Kitwell Primary School, St. Augustine’s Catholic Primary School and Nonsuch Primary School, the classroom was completed.

The second photo on the right shows the classroom in January 2013. The third photo on the right shows the classroom in January 2014.

The Head Teacher

Bright Star Nursery School

We were introduced to Bright Star Nursery School in January 2013. It quickly became apparent that this was a school in need of support. Even our guides were shocked at its condition.

The Classrooms

The Third Classroom

Bright Star School is in Old Yundum Village. It is a nursery school. It has one hundred and twenty pupils aged between three and five years old. It has two normal sized classrooms and a very small room nearby which is also used as a classroom. Imagine that…a normal sized classroom containing between fifty and sixty pupils instead of the usual thirty that we’re used to in England. The children in these classrooms sit by the desks, at the desks and on the desks. There should be a third classroom but it’s only half completed.

There are stacks of breeze blocks all over the Bright Star School site: a sign that once upon a time, the intention was for the school to be a much bigger place. But then the funding ran out.

And so, between the schools hours of eight in the morning and one in the afternoon, the one hundred and twenty nursery pupils at Bright Star School do not have a readily available supply of water. They do not have water for toilet use. They do not have water to mix the concrete to help complete their school buildings. They do not have water to grow fruit and vegetables in their garden and they do not have water to drink.

Bright Star School needs a borehole to be dug deep into the ground…and it needs a well.